Open rafts writing activity with electricity

Raft writing prompts middle school

What's the subject or the point? Audience: To whom are you writing? Give students another writing prompt for which you have already chosen the role, audience, format, and topic and have students react to the prompt either individually or in small groups. Understanding the Purpose for Writing Help students understand purpose and audience in writing by modeling and providing opportunities to practice writing different forms, such as persuasive or explanatory text. A letter? Be sure the student can explain to you what is meant by role, audience, format and topic. Write an essay about how the school can do a better job of improving the environment as yourself. Describe each of these using simple examples: role, audience, format, and topic. A friend? It includes writing from different viewpoints. Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content when shared.

At first, it may be best to have all students react to the same prompt so the class can learn from varied responses. Topic and strong verb: What are you writing about? Write an essay about how the school can do a better job of improving the environment as yourself.

Open rafts writing activity with electricity

Use role playing as a method for explaining the different aspects of RAFT writing. Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content. Model on a whiteboard, overhead projector, or chart paper how you would write in response to the prompt. It includes writing from different viewpoints. Have the student review the concept and assignment orally first. Writing to learn across the curriculum and the English teacher. Model how to write responses to the prompts, and discuss the key elements as a class. Be sure the student can explain to you what is meant by role, audience, format and topic. What do you want to write about? Have a class discussion about how each student created their own version of the RAFT while using the same role, audience, format, and topic. For instance, if students are reading To Kill a Mockingbird, you may have students respond to the issues in the story as various characters to different audiences in multiple formats. Eventually, students may choose a role, audience, format, and topic entirely on their own. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt. Who do you want to write it to? Differentiated instruction For second language learners, students of varying reading skill, students with learning disabilities, and younger learners Modify the strategy, so the student learns topic, role, format and audience separately and distinctly.

A friend? Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content when shared.

raft differentiation

Who do you want to write it to? Teachers should keep this as simple and concise as possible for younger students. Mitchell, D. It provides an interactive template for students to type in possible Roles, Audiences, Formats, and Topics.

Have students practice responding to prompts individually, or in small groups. As students become comfortable in responding to RAFT prompts, you can create more than one prompt for students to respond to after a reading, lesson, or unit.

Students may decide on their own topic or the teacher may provide that element in advance.

raft writing rubric

Model how to write responses to the prompts, and discuss the key elements as a class. Decide on an area of study currently taking place in your classroom for which you could collaborate with the students and write a class RAFT.

raft writing template
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